Topic: NCI Director John Niederhuber

I had to share this with all.  There is an allocation of funds from the Obama Administration directed towards health care. 


Prioritizing Cancer Research
Posted June 4, 2009
Two recent meetings highlighted some of the growing challenges NCI faces in coordinating and leading the complex landscape of cancer research within the biomedical research community.

Last Monday, I met with a new coalition of advocacy organizations concerned with a group of cancers - brain, esophagus, liver, lung, myeloma, pancreas, ovarian, and stomach - each with a survival rate of less than 50 percent. Representing 20 different organizations, the group presented data showing that 276,040 deaths (49.1 percent of the cancer deaths predicted in 2009) will come from those eight forms of cancer. The advocates are concerned that those same cancers only account for approximately 18 percent of the NCI funded research portfolio, and they seek a greater emphasis on these cancers.

Shortly after, I accompanied Acting NIH Director Raynard Kington and several fellow NIH Institute and Center directors to testify before the Senate Appropriations Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Subcommittee on the President's NIH budget request for FY 2010. As you will recall, the President's budget stresses the need to accelerate research in cancer and autism, and it commits the Obama Administration to an eight-year goal of doubling funding for cancer research at NIH. The subcommittee chairman, Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa, wanted to know why such a large proportion of the 2010 funding increase for NIH goes to cancer. "I know the statistics on cancer," the Senator said, "

THIS INFORMATION IS NOT INTENDED NOR IMPLIED TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF YOUR PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH CARE PROVIDER