Re: Nurses Corner - Professional opinions

So i will add as a patient and practitioner... great referral to the palliative doctors if they are available but this is what was in my handbag for my personal treatments.

chemo with  Emend (Aprepitant), Aloxi ( Palonosetron)(  Dexamethasone, ===== ALL IV .. It is absorbed better this route that is per their packaging instructions for providers.

Emend and Aloxi  are the anti nausea drugs
dexamethasone is a steroid
All of these are supposed to give a few days of support for the nausea. 

Once worn off this is what is in my medicine bag for symptoms.

1) ZOFRAN-- who can live without this... I keep the ODT preparation... this is quick dissolving tablets.

2) Promethizine-  an old but goody anti nausea medicine... but will make you sleepy... might be good after that steroid to help with insomnia.

3) Reglan- helps with digestion.... gets the system working if a bit slow and helps with nausea.

4) Ativan- if all else fails and I am not keeping anything down will work.. only had to use this when I was on oxaliplatin... did not agree with me.

5) And if all else fails i go to a cup of mint/ginger tea.... smile

Not sure about anything else out there but I am sure there are tons other medications .. you just need to discuss with your doctor and make them think outside of the box for relief!

Michelle

27 (edited by KarenD Thu, 20 Jul 2017 13:04:22)

Re: Nurses Corner - Professional opinions

How to find health care information that is accurate and reliable

It is important to remember when doing your own research on this cancer or any other medical issue, it is good practice to turn to reliable and accurate information as a basis for your health care decisions in addition to your physician's input and care.  General web searches may provide access to information which is accurate, but more likely than not lead individuals to websites or people/groups who claim to have performed real research on their chosen topics but in fact, did not.

Read studies, learn how to decipher the scientific language, or use sources which are accurate and written in non-medical language such as http://www.medscape.com/

Here are some websites which provide information which is reliable, accurate, and up to date.

http://www.jointcommission.org/assets/1 … nt_101.pdf

How do you find  information which is believable/reliable when there is so much information out there? 

Here are some tips from UCSF on how to find accurate information when doing your own research.

https://www.ucsfhealth.org/education/ev … formation/

When I do research on a medical topic I will only go to certain places to find this information and will look to see how old the information is.  Anything over five years old is less desirable than more recent studies as everything in the medical world is constantly being updated/is changing.  Additionally I will look to see who sponsors the website.  Is it a .org, .edu, or .gov?  Websites with these addresses are sponsored by non-profits, universities, or the government and are therefore more reliable than a .com.
Does the website have editors, or is it written by one person?  Does the website link their claims to actual studies or do they use testimonials only?  Testimonials do not prove that their product or idea works.  Please think about these things when reading information on the web. 

Here are some of the places I go for information:

https://www.nih.gov/

https://www.cancer.gov/

https://www.ebscohost.com/nursing/produ … l-complete

http://www.sciencedirect.com/

http://www.esmo.org/

https://www.asco.org/

https://www.nccn.org/

-Karen BSN, RN, CHPN

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice.  If you have questions or concerns, please consult your physician or health care provider.

Re: Nurses Corner - Professional opinions

Updated Guidelines on Chemotherapy Induced Nausea and Vomiting: American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO)

http://www.asco.org/practice-guidelines … ines#/9796


-Karen

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice.  If you have questions or concerns, please consult your physician or health care provider.

Re: Nurses Corner - Professional opinions

Integration of Palliative Care Into Standard Oncology Care: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Update

http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.2016.70.1474

More on palliative care.  This article is from the Journal of Clinical Oncology, published by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO).

Patients with advanced cancer or a high symptom burden, should have a referral to a palliative care physician in addition to their other physicians as palliative care greatly improves quality of life.

-Karen

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice.  If you have questions or concerns, please consult your physician or health care provider.

30 (edited by KarenD Yesterday 08:08:17)

Re: Nurses Corner - Professional opinions

When receiving chemotherapy, have you as a patient ever received education on infiltration or extravasation of chemotherapy agents?  The most important thing a nurse can do to prevent and or minimize tissue damage due to the leakage of chemotherapy into the skin, is to educate the patient who is receiving the drug. 

When individuals receive chemotherapy via a peripheral i.v., frequent assessments should occur to make sure the vein is intact, and the drug is not leaking into the surrounding tissue.  Although much less common, leakage of medication can occur with the use of a port a cath as well, if the needle is too short, becomes dislodged, and so forth. 

Here is some information although directed at nurses, which includes a lot of great patient teaching information.  It is best to be well informed as a patient, so you will know if there is an issue with your intravenous site.

https://www.inpractice.com/Textbooks/On … age-6.aspx


https://cjon.ons.org/sites/default/file … 3PAGE1.pdf

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23372097



-Karen

This information is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice.  If you have questions or concerns, please consult your physician or health care provider.