Topic: Impact of Salinomycin on human cholangiocarcinoma: induction of apopto

Impact of Salinomycin on human cholangiocarcinoma: induction of apoptosis and impairment of tumor cell proliferation in vitro

http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2407/12/466/abstract

Any advice or comments I give are based on personal experiences and knowledge and are my opinions only, they are not to be substituted for professional medical advice. Please seek professional advice from a qualified doctor or medical professional.

Re: Impact of Salinomycin on human cholangiocarcinoma: induction of apopto

Gavin and others: I recently read an article in the USA Today which was a summary of a JAMA article regarding a new method for growing cancer cells in the laboratory. The method was discussed with regard to developing a drug treatment for a recurring non-cancerous tumor that was very rare and caused the involved individual to have to undergo over 340 surgeries over the past 20 plus years of his 24 year old life.  The work to grow cancer cells in the lab and then use the small tumors as a means to identify effective treatment regimes was being done at Georgetown University in Washington, D. C. 

Given the strong similarity of this none responsive tumor to the behavior of CC to chemo or radiation, is anyone aware of or would it be beneficial to start a campaign to grow CC in the lab as a means to significantly escalate the speed by which an effective treatment could be developed?

I had a large fist sized tumor and half of my liver removed 18 months ago, experienced a single mestastes of the cancer to my left lung 9 months after my initial surgery and had that 8 mm nodule removed, and now am waiting to have three additional nodules of the same size removed from my lungs.  As I may have lots of lung to give now, and would love to believe that these will be the last nodules ever, I would even better like to have a true solution to end the cancer in my body without having to experience the shooting in the dark process of current chemo therapies which appear to have a near zero long term success rate.

Thanks

Ken

Re: Impact of Salinomycin on human cholangiocarcinoma: induction of apopto

Ken.... I have not read the above mentioned article however; I assume that due to the "severe" rarity of the cancer, the necessary tumor tissue was not available. Therefore, the cancer cells had to be reproduced - a remarkable accomplishment. 
For our cancer though there is tumor tissue available for research.  Although, it is the rightful property of the owner, generally is it stored at the center of retrieval.  For example:  the major cancer centers store hundreds and more tissue samples, but they don't conduct more than minimal research at best.   
The reasons for the minimally conducted research are based on a multitude of factors, but most if not all are related to one factor only:  "Funding" or the lack thereof. (This includes Government, Industry, Individuals and Foundations.) 
For several years now The Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation has been working toward finding a solution to one of the major issues regarding the lack of research for our cancer.  Ideally we would like to establish a designated tumor bank for our cancer only; a tissue bank that would encourage all researchers national and abroad to conduct research on this cancer.  But due to a multitude of valid reasons, the logistic of this happening are far removed from reality.   
But what is in the realm of reality is a tissue bank financially supported by the Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation.  We are looking into the possibility of allocating such funds within the near future. 
Sorry, Ken, for rambling.  You must know that much work is done behind the scene and that sometimes I become a bit too passionate about this disease.
Hugs
Marion

THIS INFORMATION IS NOT INTENDED NOR IMPLIED TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF YOUR PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH CARE PROVIDER

Re: Impact of Salinomycin on human cholangiocarcinoma: induction of apopto

Hi Ken,

I will add my 2c to what Marion wrote.

We see new medical studies coming out all the time that use CC cells grown in the lab. Many of these studies sound promising.

Here's the problem though:

It's very easy to kill cancer cells in a petri dish. Lots of drugs/compounds can do it if applied at high enough concentrations.

Unfortunately, it's extremely hard to kill the same cells in the human body -- and not kill the patient at the same time.

The road from petri dish, to mice/rat studies, to human clinical trials, to FDA approved cancer drug, is long and arduous. New cancer drugs take up to 20 years to develop.

That said, you are absolutely right. We need to see more CC studies. The CC Foundation (Marion in particular) does a lot of work in the medical community to encourage new studies. AMMF charity in the UK does similar advocacy work.

Best wishes,
Eli

Re: Impact of Salinomycin on human cholangiocarcinoma: induction of apopto

Additionally other issues arise with retrieval and handling of tissue.  It also is estimated that up to 40% of tissue is contaminated, leading to false studies. The NCI is addressing the problems and is in the process of establishing the strict guidelines needed for accurate study samples.

THIS INFORMATION IS NOT INTENDED NOR IMPLIED TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF YOUR PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH CARE PROVIDER

Re: Impact of Salinomycin on human cholangiocarcinoma: induction of apopto

One and All:  This is exactly the kind of passion I am looking for, but first some clarifications. 

The research I am speaking of is not on tumor samples post surgery and such but on actual tumors grown in the lab. The great aspect of this approach is that different drugs, combat ions, and strengths can be evaluated in the lab in a near "live" situation.  Such an approach can get at the fundamentals much more quickly, and on a personal level, than can be achieved thru long term studies. In the case discussed in the article, the patient, and believe or not one of the researchers, each had a condition that causes recurring tumors with no known or proven treatment method, sans surgery. Success for the individual was achieved by growing the tumor in the lab and hen trying known, different, and new drug theraphies. In the end, a new and different drug was determined to be the best.

I plan to write both the researchers and the oncologist I saw at Mayo, Rochester, MN, to see if I can get them to use the tumors from my lungs tat I exect to ave removed in December as a starting point.

Thanks for he comments back and I will keep you nformed.

Ken

Re: Impact of Salinomycin on human cholangiocarcinoma: induction of apopto

Bye the bye, here is a link to the article.

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nati … e/1595681/

8 (edited by marions Mon, 15 Oct 2012 22:51:05)

Re: Impact of Salinomycin on human cholangiocarcinoma: induction of apopto

Thanks so much, Ken for enclosing the link and for clarification of the approach taken. 
The way I understand it (in the most simple of forms) is that their elaborate cell culture model for in-vitro cell lines produced the desired result.
This then differs from observing the heterogeneity of drug response in fresh human tumors to chemotherapeutic agents and the numerous others ways of growing and applying culture cells.  Oh my, I am over my head on this one and better stop right now. 
Please, dear Ken, keep us posted on the developments. 
And the best of luck on your hopefully “final" lung tumor extraction.
Hugs,
Marion

THIS INFORMATION IS NOT INTENDED NOR IMPLIED TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF YOUR PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH CARE PROVIDER

Re: Impact of Salinomycin on human cholangiocarcinoma: induction of apopto

Marion

Now you see my enthusiasm for the possibilities!  Imagine being able to take a biopsy, culture the tumor into many small replicates, and then testing each in real time to old drugs, new drugs, different doses, etc.  such an approach could speed up the process of finding both individual and generic means by which to both slow down and stop the tumors.

It appears that the research team has been able to grow breast, lung, and a few other cancers in the lab.  I want to add CC with the same goal as the published work, finding a way to end the insanity of surgery being the only option for he majority and offering a faster way to find new ways to eradicate the repeat occurrence of after the fact tumors.

Ken

10 (edited by marions Mon, 15 Oct 2012 22:53:05)

Re: Impact of Salinomycin on human cholangiocarcinoma: induction of apopto

Ken, I share your enthusiasm and wish for our cancer to be included in the newest research advances. We need it, we deserve it, but we need to fight for it.
If I may share with you: 
Given the almost six years of my navigating the maze of involvement with Clinical Trials, Research Advocacy, NCI Appointments, Disease Specific Task Forces, FDA Advocacy Participations, Drug Information Association Advocacy and Programs, Steering Committees, attendance of medical conferences and rare disease relevant symposiums, recruiting and training of volunteers and much more, I can tell you that the absolute biggest challenge we continue to face is the fact that we are classified a "Rare Cancer." Here is where everything comes to a screeching halt. We lack the necessary funding from Government, Entrepreneurs and other individuals in order to drive forward research and development and we continue to see a lackluster interest from Academia to virtually non-existent interest from Industry. 
Having said that we must recognize the accomplishments achieved for our cancer within the last few years such as the very first standard of care, advanced treatment options, increased awareness of this disease in the US and worldwide, and a steadily increasing development of clinical trials. 
Herewith, dear Ken, I offer my help.  Like you I would like our cancer to be included in the above mentioned research because; our patients as much as everyone else deserve a chance at receiving life saving and life extending treatments. 
Hugs,
Marion

THIS INFORMATION IS NOT INTENDED NOR IMPLIED TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF YOUR PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH CARE PROVIDER