Topic: A vitamin pill a day keeps cancer away? Unlikely

A vitamin pill a day keeps cancer away? Unlikely

http://scienceblog.cancerresearchuk.org … r-homepage

Any advice or comments I give are based on personal experiences and knowledge and are my opinions only, they are not to be substituted for professional medical advice. Please seek professional advice from a qualified doctor or medical professional.

Re: A vitamin pill a day keeps cancer away? Unlikely

Gav, it didn't work for Teddy and me! So, I finally gave up my pre-natals........LOL

Teddy ~In our hearts forever~ATTITUDE is EVERYTHING
Any suggestion I offer is intended as friendly advice based solely on my own experience. Please consult your doctor for professional guidance.

Re: A vitamin pill a day keeps cancer away? Unlikely

Thanks, Gavin for posting this valuable link. 
In regards to the study group (middle-aged or older men) I am irked by the fact that we continue to see an exclusion of the "female" population.   
According to the published studies for 2011 there are 101.3 men to every 100 females in the world.
Hello, researchers, we are not to be overlooked. 
Hugs,
Marion

THIS INFORMATION IS NOT INTENDED NOR IMPLIED TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF YOUR PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH CARE PROVIDER

Re: A vitamin pill a day keeps cancer away? Unlikely

Dear Marion, please don't be irked smile

The study in question was done at Harvard. It's part of their ongoing research called the Physicians' Health Study. Yes, it focuses on males.

http://phs.bwh.harvard.edu/

Harvard runs a similar series of studies that includes only females. It's called the Nurses' Health Study.

http://www.channing.harvard.edu/nhs/

I'm guessing Harvard researchers have some very good reasons to run these studies separately. Males and females have distinct health issues!!

5 (edited by marions Mon, 29 Oct 2012 17:51:32)

Re: A vitamin pill a day keeps cancer away? Unlikely

Oh, Eli, I forgot about the Nurse's Health Study. Thanks for setting me straight. 
Sorry, I owe an apology to all of you males. Forgiven?
Hugs,
Marion

THIS INFORMATION IS NOT INTENDED NOR IMPLIED TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF YOUR PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH CARE PROVIDER

Re: A vitamin pill a day keeps cancer away? Unlikely

Hi,
BTW, I stopped taking multivitamin pills after my second resection in  June 2010.
One reason is that ,most of them contain folic acid and if someone like me who is on capecitabine(Xeloda) or injectable like 5 FU, it may not be a good idea.
God bless.

Please know that my personal opinion is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. If  provided, information are for educational purposes.Consult doctor is a MUST for changing of treatment plans.

7 (edited by marions Fri, 19 Oct 2012 18:58:57)

Re: A vitamin pill a day keeps cancer away? Unlikely

Percy...my husband was given 5-FU plus leucovorin.  This was almost six years ago.  But the most current literature I found dispells the benefit- risk factor of the combination:
http://www.drugs.com/food-interactions/ … eloda.html

Hugs,
Marion

THIS INFORMATION IS NOT INTENDED NOR IMPLIED TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF YOUR PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH CARE PROVIDER

Re: A vitamin pill a day keeps cancer away? Unlikely

Eli...do you know whether this very same study is conducted on women also -Vitamins - Health benefits?
Hugs,
Marion

THIS INFORMATION IS NOT INTENDED NOR IMPLIED TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF YOUR PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH CARE PROVIDER

Re: A vitamin pill a day keeps cancer away? Unlikely

Marion,

No, the very same study is not conducted on women.

Physicians' Health Study II was specifically designed to test common vitamins and multivitamins. It was randomized and placebo-controlled.

Nurses' Health Study is a much broader study. It looks at many different health issues. And it's not randomized. They ask nurses to fill in questionnaires on a regular basis.

That said....

Nurses' study did look at the multivitamins. I found the summary of their results in this article:

Do Multivitamins Make You Healthier?
http://www.wellsource.com/articles-mhc/ … thier.html

Here's the summary:

[Nurses' Health Study] found no significant health advantage to taking multivitamins, except for a slightly lower risk for colon cancer in women taking multivitamins for more than 15 years. (Some research shows folic acid to be protective against bowel cancer.) Researchers also found a slight increased risk for fatal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in multivitamin users.

The article mentions another large study called The Women's Health Initiative. It too examined many different health issues. Here's their publication on multivitamins:

Multivitamin use and risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease in the Women's Health Initiative cohorts
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19204221

Their conclusion:

After a median follow-up of 8.0 and 7.9 years in the clinical trial and observational study cohorts, respectively, the Women's Health Initiative study provided convincing evidence that multivitamin use has little or no influence on the risk of common cancers, CVD (cardio-vascular desease), or total mortality in postmenopausal women.

Re: A vitamin pill a day keeps cancer away? Unlikely

Thanks much, Eli.  This is really interesting. Thanks again,
Hugs,
Marion

THIS INFORMATION IS NOT INTENDED NOR IMPLIED TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ADVICE. YOU SHOULD ALWAYS SEEK THE ADVICE OF YOUR PHYSICIAN OR OTHER QUALIFIED HEALTH CARE PROVIDER

Re: A vitamin pill a day keeps cancer away? Unlikely

Glad that the link was of interest and use and thanks to you Eli for posting your other links too.

Gavin

Any advice or comments I give are based on personal experiences and knowledge and are my opinions only, they are not to be substituted for professional medical advice. Please seek professional advice from a qualified doctor or medical professional.