Topic: How to Die in Oregon (death with dignity)

I was wondering if anyone as ever seen this documentary?  It features a patient with cholangiocarcinoma who chooses Death with Dignity, which is legal in Oregon. For those of you who may not of heard of it, here is the definition:  Death with Dignity Act which allows terminally-ill Oregonians to end their lives through the voluntary self-administration of lethal medications, expressly prescribed by a physician for that purpose
What are everyone's thoughts on the subject?  I know it is controversial and highly debated but I would still like to hear people's opinions.

Take care,

Susie

Re: How to Die in Oregon (death with dignity)

Susie, a very interesting topic. I have and will always be in favor of DDA. I feel we have a right to determine our own destiny. BUT, only in the case of a catastrophic disease. I also think in a living will it could be stated at what point one would qualify. I think Oregon got it right. Let's keep this cool, it's a hot topic! Dignity, yes.

Teddy ~In our hearts forever~ATTITUDE is EVERYTHING
Any suggestion I offer is intended as friendly advice based solely on my own experience. Please consult your doctor for professional guidance.

Re: How to Die in Oregon (death with dignity)

I was in favour of it before, but even more so now.

There have been a couple of high profile cases in the last year or two in the UK calling for this to be legalised.  We are getting there in healthcare within the UK but I sometimes feel we still have a long way to go in treating and caring for patients with dignity.  The Liverpool Care Pathway causes great divide and controversy in it's use so I guess DDA is still a long way off.

Clare

In the stars now . . . .

4 (edited by PCL1029 Thu, 18 Apr 2013 20:46:09)

Re: How to Die in Oregon (death with dignity)

Hi, everyone,
My answer to this topic is, if you and your caregiver can wait for 5-7 more years and you(the  patient him/herself) wants to fight it out and will endure the side effects  that the treatments  dish out for you; then please  keep up with the current knowledge to decide when to give in or give up.

The "5-7 years" time frame is given by  Dr. Hahn who is a medical oncologist and  runs the The Center For Cancer Genome Discovery Lab, one of the largest 24/7 genetic lab in the States, and is the Deputy Chief Scientific Officer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He said his lab has discovered several new oncogenes as well as targets that will pave the way for new therapeutic approaches.The approaches ,the models and the tools  that his lab  had pioneered and developed have already become widely used worldwide  to discover and validate molecularly targeted cancer therapies.
Dr. Hahn indicated that 5-7 years from now, the field of chemotherapy and targeted therapy will be a lot more precise and the treatment approach will be much more  specific and less adverse drug reaction cause by the new crops of new drugs that will be on the markets soon.

The same sentiment was also echoed by Peter Smith,PhD, the executive director of  Drug Discovery Biology at H3 BioMedicine where he is responsible for overseeing drug discovery and translational medicine efforts of lead projects. He also works on identifying  novel mechanisms of resistance that impacted clinical trial design and involved in additional drug  discovery effort. His research efforts resulted in the design and initiation of several clinical trials . But he also suggested if all the labs can share each lab's data as an open source with each other ,  and bring the patients , researchers, clinicians and scientists to work  together then things will go much faster and sooner.

In short, cooperation among different groups and patient education are the keys for speedy new drug development in targeted  therapy and biomarker development.

So, just try to give all of you an up- date development and/or difficulties on the  frontier of new drug development and you decide what  you will do with this information in the future if needed.

The above information was from the CanLiv symposium that I had attended on April 5, 2013 in Washington DC.

Personally,the  above information somewhat changed my mind about what I had decided .  And I will keep an open eye on both  the new drug development and the new interest in  immunology related treatment for cancer to make my final decision on my condition at that moment when the time is come.
God bless.

Please know that my personal opinion is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. If  provided, information are for educational purposes.Consult doctor is a MUST for changing of treatment plans.

Re: How to Die in Oregon (death with dignity)

Percy, this is fabulous news and the hope we are waiting for. Perhaps we could think of a slogan using for example Cure Cholangio Carcinoma ...Courage to Continue 5 more years.  Just thinking of the top of my head. Its always a mess when I start thinking!

Teddy ~In our hearts forever~ATTITUDE is EVERYTHING
Any suggestion I offer is intended as friendly advice based solely on my own experience. Please consult your doctor for professional guidance.

Re: How to Die in Oregon (death with dignity)

Thanks for responding.  It is an interesting topic and a topic I wish I didn't have to think about at 33, that's for sure!

Has anyone seen the documentary?  I'm thinking of watching it since it involves a CC patient, but I know it will be terribly sad and difficult.

Take care,

Susie

Re: How to Die in Oregon (death with dignity)

Susie how do we get to see it? On U Tube?

Teddy ~In our hearts forever~ATTITUDE is EVERYTHING
Any suggestion I offer is intended as friendly advice based solely on my own experience. Please consult your doctor for professional guidance.

Re: How to Die in Oregon (death with dignity)

No, it's not on you tube.  Per the movies website here are the options:


See the film:

    Watch on HBO

    Buy the DVD

    Rent or buy on iTunes

    Rent on Netflix

Re: How to Die in Oregon (death with dignity)

Thanks, Susie. Somewhere it feels like I have seen it if not new. If new than I didn't.

Teddy ~In our hearts forever~ATTITUDE is EVERYTHING
Any suggestion I offer is intended as friendly advice based solely on my own experience. Please consult your doctor for professional guidance.

Re: How to Die in Oregon (death with dignity)

Interesting topic and great to hear everyone's points of view on this. Saw this piece on the news today and thought about this discussion and thought I'd post the link here -

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-22191059

In Scotland, one of the MSP's in the Scottish Parliament is attempting to bring a Bill on right to die. The MSP, Margo MacDonald has Parkinsons and has been very vocal on this subject for a few years.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Margo_MacDonald

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotland-s … s-19646868

THis is the Bill that she tried to bring forward in 2012 and I think she will be bringing a new Bill forward in 2013.

http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/S4_Me … lodged.pdf

Just thought I'd post these in case anyone is interested.

Gavin

Any advice or comments I give are based on personal experiences and knowledge and are my opinions only, they are not to be substituted for professional medical advice. Please seek professional advice from a qualified doctor or medical professional.

Re: How to Die in Oregon (death with dignity)

I am so in favor of death with dignity. I want to go with forethought and with decision, with a choice born of my will and at a time of my choosing. Wish it were available in DC.

Re: How to Die in Oregon (death with dignity)

I so agree Holly. Teddy was able to have the time to leave, his way. Every thing was in order. He had even made up his precious packets for all the kids and Grandkids. He had a ton of pins and stuff from the Shrine beside golf equipment and everytime one of the kids came over things got dispersed. He had a Christmas Village that was on a long table and it had grown from 4 feet to 5 X 8 with layers. That went to his daughter. She saw to it that the kids got their favorite pieces. We always laughed. After we got the final prognosis we went to the lake in Milwaukee and one of his goals was to bring packets for the Milwaukee bunch, his and mine. So he went into a back bedroom and our son-in -law led eveyone one by one for a short visit. All of a sudden the son-in=law starts laughing and says, "Wow, I feel like everyone was paying their respects to the Godfather" and we all cracked up as he was not far off base with that one. Then after his Memorial we had a dessert table and for dinner 28 of just family went to Dinner. We were getting ready and his 30 yr old Grandaughter said, I know, lets all wear something of Grandpa's to dinner. SO all converged in our bedroom and we all went to dinner each of us wearing an item of Teddys. It was so neat and just what he would expect from us! What I am trying to say is we really all did it his way! Yes, Teddy, attitude is everything you left us missing you but happy. I am sorry didn't realize I was reminising so long.

Teddy ~In our hearts forever~ATTITUDE is EVERYTHING
Any suggestion I offer is intended as friendly advice based solely on my own experience. Please consult your doctor for professional guidance.

Re: How to Die in Oregon (death with dignity)

I watched this movie with great interest, as we just went through the process with my husband.  I can tell you that if it were available in PA (we moved from Columbia last October), he would have chosen to end his life earlier than it did naturally.  Liver failure is a tough process, but I will say, that in the last stage (last week or so), pain control was not an issue.  It was the encephalopathy that was most disturbing.  I really hope that he was as oblivious to what was happening to him as he seemed to be.
The sweet lady in the movie that had liver cancer chose to end her life at about the point that Chris was about 6 weeks before his death.  She seemed to be very short of breath, probably due to the ascites.  She should have had a drain so that she could have been more comfortable.  Chris had one for about 2.5 months and it made a world of difference.  Anyway, although his last 6 weeks were pretty hard, I can't say I'm sorry to have had him here for that time.  Taking care of him was very rewarding to me although heartbreaking at the same time.
Having said all that, I hope that the option is available to me when my time approaches.  I would find it very comforting to know I had some control over my life.